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The Best Tick Repellent for Humans

There has been a significant and steady increase in the number of reported tick-borne infections in the United States over the past decade. Lyme disease is the most common, accounting for 82-percent of tick-borne infections in the country.

Lyme disease is carried by hard-bodied ticks. The tick’s ever-expanding geographical range has played a role in the increase of reported cases of infection. There has also been an increase in tick-borne viruses, particularly cases of Powassan virus (POWV).

Tick repellents are a great first line of defense against ticks when outdoors, because the best protection is prevention. These sprays work by making your body unattractive to ticks and other pests, by actively killing them on contact, or serving both purposes.

Choosing a tick repellent isn’t as simple as picking any old bottle with the words ‘Tick Repellent’ on it. There are a few considerations to keep in mind when selecting the best tick spray for humans.

See the full article by Ben Cannon on Bug Lord's website here.

LAST UPDATED

December 3, 2023

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The Bug Lord team has a passion for curating content on how to completely and safely eliminate pests from your home. We use our decades of hands-on experience.

From step-by-step guides and hands-on reviews to industry trends and analysis, everything we do is backed by scientific and fact-based approaches. Because of our attention to quality, Bug Lord is the #1 DIY pest and bug control resource.

Our team of writers includes professional pest control technicians, experienced homeowners, and scholars with advanced degrees in biology and entomology. We compile everyone’s experience and knowledge into giving you the best pest control information on the internet.

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