No items found.

What mom's need to know about bug bites and insect repellents

1. How do I put on sunblock and insect repellent? Which order and how? Always remember, sunscreen first, applied liberally and often, let it dry and then apply insect repellent once or sparingly if more than once.

2. Why do I care about putting on insect repellent on my child? Bites are usually harmless but in some cases they can spread dangerous disease like Lyme disease, Zika virus, West Nile virus, etc. So keep exposed skin covered as much as possible, no loose clothing.

3. Is insect repellent safe in my newborn? DEET is a liquid insect repellent that is primarily used to ward off mosquitoes and ticks and usually sold in spray form. It blocks a mosquito's sense of smell. DEET is not recommended for infants less than 2 months old.

4. Is DEET safe in children? DEET has been proven safe in kids, but be cautious with its use. If a child is outside for only an hour or 2, use lower concentrations of DEET (ie OFF! family care insect repellent has 7% DEET). If the child is outside for much longer than that consider higher concentrations of DEET since that lasts longer (ie Repel Insect Repellent has 40% DEET). These products should be applied ONLY once per day. Consider pre-treating outer layers of clothing with insect repellent and let the clothing dry for 2 hours before wearing them. Always apply to exposed skin but not the face and hands to avoid ingestion, and spray while in an open area so no one breathes it in.

See the full list on News 12's website here.

LAST UPDATED

October 22, 2023

Written by
Photo thumbnail Blog Author

Long Island News

Media Mentions from Long Island News

24/7 Hyper-local breaking news, weather, traffic, politics, investigative and more.

Explore More Content

Media Mentions

Sawyer Insect Repellent is a versatile picaridin spray recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) as safe and effective for most people. Our testers liked the evaporating smell and how the spray feels once it dries.

Media Mentions

Insects and arachnids that bite in self-defense instead of to feed -- such as yellow jackets, bees, wasps, hornets, certain ants or spiders -- cannot be repelled with insect repellents.

Drugs.com
Media Mentions from Drugs.com

Media Mentions

The number of bug-borne diseases is increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of places they're spreading to is also on the rise.

WXYZ Detroit 7
Media Mentions from WXYZ Detroit 7