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The Best Camping Cooking Gear for Every Type of Camper

Camp food is traditionally simple: think hot dogs and beans over a fire. But the reality is, much of what you cook at home can be cooked at the campground. There’s just one catch—you need to have the right camping cooking gear.

Making mouthwatering camping meals is so much easier when you have good cooking gear. But with so much gear to choose from, what do you really need?

Every camper that’s planning on cooking needs to have a few staple items in their camping kitchen arsenal. First up? A cook stove or a campfire. You’ll also need something to cook in, something to serve with, and something on which to place your delicious camping grub…and finally, something to eat that grub with.

Camping cooking gear differs depending on the type of camping you’re doing; a car camper might bring different items than a backpacker or RV camper. These basic items will get you started, no matter what kind of camping you’re doing:

  • Cooler
  • Reusable ice packs
  • Cast iron pot and pan
  • Cooking spatulas
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Plates, bowls, cups
  • Eating utensils

See the full article by Tana Baer on The Dyrt's website here.

LAST UPDATED

October 22, 2023

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It all started with a love of the outdoors and a desire to make camping easier for everyone.

However you camp — in a tent, trailer, RV, or cabin — we’re committed to helping you have the best camping experiences possible. Here you’ll find resources and connections to the most active camping community in the world. Welcome to The Dyrt.

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