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Here’s what you need to put together a camp kitchen that is both inexpensive and functional. (Photo: Tuckraider/iStock)[/caption]

Outside: Everything You Need to Cook Outside for Less than $100


Assemble a camp kitchen that is both inexpensive and functional


My very first piece of camping gear was a $10 Girl Scouts mess kit purchased in the early 2000s that included a matching plastic plate, bowl, mug, and utensils, all stored in a net drawstring bag. The fork, knife, and spoon clipped together with a little ring. The mug had notches for measuring liquids. After meals, I dunked the bag of dishes in warm, soapy water and hung it on a clothesline to dry for the next meal.

Looking back, it was completely unsanitary to not wash each item individually, but at the time, it seemed genius and innovative. Over the course of nearly 20 years and hundreds of nights under the stars, I’ve replaced that set and added just a few more items to my kit, but organizing my camp-kitchen bin still brings me joy. It means I’m about to set out on a trip that will be packed with memories, or that I’ve just come back from one.

You don’t need to empty your bank account on a mountaineering-style stove to eat well in the woods—or in your backyard. Here’s what it takes to put together a camp kitchen that is both inexpensive and functional. Some of these items are probably already in your cupboards at home.

See the full article from Amelia Arvesen on Outside Online's website here.

LAST UPDATED

May 3, 2022

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