No items found.

Do You Really Need a Water Filter for Backpacking and Mountain Hunting?

Water purification is vital to staying healthy in the mountains and after a trip, but are filters really the answer? Here’s what our staff writers think

Water purification is one of the more boring aspects of backcountry hunting, but it’s also one of the most important bases to cover. Beaver Fever (Giardia) and other unsavory parasites might not be lurking in every stream or mountain seep that you find, but you should proceed as if they are. If you don’t, you’re taking an unnecessary chance at getting sick—sometimes very sick.

Fortunately for backcountry hunters and hikers, there are lots of options for sanitizing the drinking water you collect. There are short-term emergency filters like Lifestraw and the Survivor Filter Bottle. There are also high-tech water filters that can cost hundreds of dollars, as well as Steripen UV-treatment water purification tools available.

What is the best choice for backcountry water purification? That depends on who you ask. So, we’ll let you hear what two of our Staff Writers—both of whom are well-versed in the backcountry—have to say about it. Whichever method of water purification you choose, use something, and use it always.

Continue reading the full article by Tyler Freel and Laura Lancaster here.

LAST UPDATED

September 13, 2022

Written by
Photo thumbnail Blog Author

Outdoor Life

Media Mentions from Outdoor Life

Outdoor Life is America's source for hunting and fishing information, new gun reviews and gear tests.

MEDIA MENTIONS

My only complaint is that eventually, backflushing won’t be enough. These can clog up after some time and no amount of back flushing will fix its low flow. I went through 2 on the AT. However, it will attach to Smart Water Bottles and most bladders!

Anna Hamrick

MEDIA MENTIONS

Built for backcountry reliability and portability, the Sawyer Squeeze filter is our pick for the best portable water purifier.

Pete Ortiz
Writer

MEDIA MENTIONS

The Sawyer Squeeze was (by far) the most common Pacific Crest Trail water filter this year – for the fifth year in a row. It’s a $39, 3 oz / 85 g hollow fiber filter that rids your drinking water of protozoa and bacteria (and floaties). It can be used with Sawyer bags (included with the filter) or with compatible water bottles (Smartwater is the bottle of choice for many hikers).

Halfway Anywhere
Media Mentions from Halfway Anywhere