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7 Cheap(ish) Things to Bring Leaf Peeping

Halloween candy lines supermarket shelves, Starbucks brought back the Pumpkin Spice Latte, and Disney dropped the trailer for Hocus Pocus 2—it’s officially fall, y’all. And that means it’s time to step into your boots, pull on your flannels, and head outdoors to admire the changing colors. Whether you’re planning to take in the foliage on a long, scenic drive, a rigorous hike, or just a casual stroll, the right gear ensures that your outing isn’t spoiled by bugs, fluctuating temperatures, or a phone that’s running on empty. Here are seven not-too-expensive things that’ll make your leaf-peeping experience one to remember.

1. Mud-proof Boots

Even if you don’t plan to venture deep into the woods, you may come across muddy patches of earth and trails slick with fallen leaves. A pair of waterproof rain boots with good traction keeps you upright and dry while you crunch your way along the forest floor—and they also clean off easily once you’re home. For a more strenuous hike, swap the rain boots for a pair of affordable, waterproof hiking boots like the Merrell Moab 2.

You can read Elissa Sanci's complete list of things to bring while leaf peeping here.

LAST UPDATED

October 3, 2022

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Elissa Sanci

Wirecutter

Elissa Sanci is a staff writer for Wirecutter, where she covers deals, consumer shopping, and personal finance. Based in Denver, she previously worked as an editorial assistant at Woman’s Day, where she wrote about everything from worthy charities to girls’ empowerment. Her byline has also appeared in Good Housekeeping and Marie Claire.

MEDIA MENTIONS

While DEET products may be more familiar by name and their chemical smell, sprays with 20 percent picaridin, like Sawyer Products, offer comparable protection without the harsh odor and oily feeling on your skin.

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MEDIA MENTIONS

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Halfway Anywhere
Media Mentions from Halfway Anywhere

MEDIA MENTIONS

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