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Can You Use Bug Spray on Babies and Toddlers?

"My baby gets lots of bug bites when we go outside. Is it okay if I apply mosquito repellent? What kinds are safe for her?"

When masses of mosquitoes and other hordes of biting insects are on the attack (and have you ever known a summer without them?), it would certainly be nice to encase your baby in a giant, breathable, bug-resistant bubble, wouldn't it?

But unfortunately, that's not possible. To the rescue: bug spray and other insect repellents, which can offer some safe relief from those tiny biting beasties — if used carefully.

Safe and effective bug sprays and repellents for babies and toddlers

Effective insect and mosquito repellents come in many forms, from aerosols and sprays to liquids, creams and sticks. And the good news: A lot of them are safe for babies over 2 months old.

For the under-2-month set, bug repellent isn't recommended, though you might want to consider placing insect netting around your little one's stroller or bassinet for protection. Formulations for insect repellent generally fall into four main categories.

You can continue reading the repellent breakdown here.

LAST UPDATED

October 27, 2023

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