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In Case of Crises: Products for the budding prepper.

These past few years, facing the ongoing pandemic, a return of urban firestorms, and now “atmospheric rivers,” many have found their emergency-preparedness stashes insufficient (after Hurricane Ida hit New York, for example, Google searches for sump pumps spiked 600 percent). As things don’t exactly look like they’ll be improving, we conferred with cleanup professionals, survivalists, and emergency experts to identify the best versions of products in seven categories you may want to keep on hand, including a wet/dry vac capable of sucking up 16 gallons of water. There is a lot of stuff out there for the particularly paranoid among us (flares, ammunition, gold and silver if currency becomes worthless), but here the focus is on the slightly less theoretical emergencies, including flooding, power outages, and water shutoffs.

Flashlights

It’s important to consider a flashlight’s entire slate of features: its brightness (though keep in mind that the more lumens it has, the faster its power drains), how it charges, and whether it is water-resistant.

First Aid Kits

Traditionally, commercial first aid kits have lacked what Hawke calls “dressings for real trauma.” But lately, more worthy options have emerged.

Power Bank

Stand-alone power banks can charge via several sources and output power to multiple devices at once, so you’re not reliant on one person’s cell phone in an emergency situation.

Wet/Dry Vacs

Unlike the vacuum you already own, a wet/dry vac can quickly guzzle liquids and large pieces of debris, making it essential for those with basements (or first-floor apartments) at risk of flooding. It’s also handy for clearing drains, rain gutters, and dust.

Water

According to emergency-preparedness expert Aton Edwards, “Any kind of emergency where you have to evacuate would likely classify as something that would disrupt water treatment” — meaning it’s important to have tabs or filters on hand to treat that bathtub water.

Hand-Crank Radios

These are especially useful in inclement weather. In a situation with no Wi-Fi or power, they can be used to get updates and potentially lifesaving information from sources such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s 24-hour station.

Pocketknives

You can do a lot with a multi-tool, but there are plenty of reasons to have a plain old pocketknife. Prepper Potpourri says it’s useful in a survival situation for things like “cutting cordage and making tinder for a fire.”

Stacey Dee Woods gives great detail on each of these categories and provides product suggestions for you to be prepared in case of crises, read the full article here

LAST UPDATED

May 8, 2022

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The Strategist

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While DEET products may be more familiar by name and their chemical smell, sprays with 20 percent picaridin, like Sawyer Products, offer comparable protection without the harsh odor and oily feeling on your skin.

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The Sawyer Squeeze was (by far) the most common Pacific Crest Trail water filter this year – for the fifth year in a row. It’s a $39, 3 oz / 85 g hollow fiber filter that rids your drinking water of protozoa and bacteria (and floaties). It can be used with Sawyer bags (included with the filter) or with compatible water bottles (Smartwater is the bottle of choice for many hikers).

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