No items found.

Sawyer Mini vs. LifeStraw – Which Is The Best?

Two of the most popular water filters for camping, disaster prep, and prepper bug out bags are the Sawyer Mini and LifeStraw.

Overview of the Sawyer Mini and LifeStraw

Both the Sawyer Mini and LifeStraw are hollow-fiber membrane water filters. This means that the water passes through a mesh-like membrane. The membrane catches bacteria, protozoa, algae, and other waterborne pathogens.

Compared to the bulky ceramic water filters of the past, the Sawyer Mini and LifeStraw are very compact. They are also straightforward to use.

No pumping is required, and you never have to change the filter.

I’m not exaggerating when I say these water filters are game changers.

When I was a kid, camping water filters were clunky, and the filters had to be constantly replaced. The Sawyer Mini and LifeStraw are often distributed in disaster-struck places (such as Haiti after their massive earthquake).

These water filters have probably saved thousands of lives by providing a cheap and easy solution for clean drinking water.


Continue reading the full article written by Diane Vuković here.

LAST UPDATED

December 21, 2023

Written by
Photo thumbnail Blog Author

Primal Survivor

Media Mentions from Primal Survivor

Primal Survivor offers practical and sensible advice to help you become more independent and self sufficient in your daily life. We will also help you prepare for the unexpected offering tips on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Planning.

Explore More Content

Media Mentions

Sawyer Insect Repellent is a versatile picaridin spray recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) as safe and effective for most people. Our testers liked the evaporating smell and how the spray feels once it dries.

Media Mentions

Insects and arachnids that bite in self-defense instead of to feed -- such as yellow jackets, bees, wasps, hornets, certain ants or spiders -- cannot be repelled with insect repellents.

Drugs.com
Media Mentions from Drugs.com

Media Mentions

The number of bug-borne diseases is increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of places they're spreading to is also on the rise.

WXYZ Detroit 7
Media Mentions from WXYZ Detroit 7