No items found.

The 7 best filtered water bottles for travel, according to hydration experts

Don't forget to add portable, clean water to your packing checklist! These filtered water bottles are a must for any traveler.

From road trips and backcountry camping to jet-setting across the globe, there are a few things that every traveler should have — and that includes access to clean water.

Buying overpriced water bottles is an option, of course, but who wants to throw away that kind of money and contribute to plastic waste in this day and age? And sure, you could just drink from the tap, but in many places that means risking foul, weird-tasting water — or worse, violent stomach illness.

But there’s a much better solution: reusable water bottles that come with their own built-in filtration system so you can have cool, clean sips wherever your travels take you. In fact, the best filter water bottles are a must-have when traveling to destinations that lack plentiful clean water, whether that's a far-away country or a wilderness camping trip in the next county over.

Once you have a filter water bottle for travel, you might even start using it for everyday use at home or in the office. Even when traveling within the United States, you can use these travel water bottles in hotels, as they make water taste extra-clean and fresh.

But how do these reusable bottles actually work? And what are the best filtered water bottles for travel? We consulted the hydration experts to find out.

Continue reading the full article written by Ashley Keegan here.

LAST UPDATED

September 27, 2023

Written by
Photo thumbnail Blog Author

Ashley Keegan

Ashley Keegan is a freelance contributor to Mashable.

Explore More Content

Media Mentions

Sawyer Insect Repellent is a versatile picaridin spray recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) as safe and effective for most people. Our testers liked the evaporating smell and how the spray feels once it dries.

Media Mentions

Insects and arachnids that bite in self-defense instead of to feed -- such as yellow jackets, bees, wasps, hornets, certain ants or spiders -- cannot be repelled with insect repellents.

Drugs.com
Media Mentions from Drugs.com

Media Mentions

The number of bug-borne diseases is increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of places they're spreading to is also on the rise.

WXYZ Detroit 7
Media Mentions from WXYZ Detroit 7