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How To Apply Sawyer Bug Spray To Skin

Sawyer is a high-quality insect repellent company in the USA. Applying Sawyer bug sprays is easy. When applying this bug spray, hold the Sawyer bottle 6-8 inches from your skin and shake well before application.

Next, apply the Sawyer insect repellent lightly onto exposed areas like the neck or face while moving in a circular motion for full coverage with no excess Sawyer product on hand; rub gently into pores so that all parts are absorbed before letting dry completely—usually 30 minutes.

Because we spend a lot of time outdoors doing garden and other outdoor redecorating projects, we always need to apply Sawyer insect repellent to prevent bites by black outdoor worms. In this article, we'll show you how to apply Sawyer bug spray and explore the benefits of applying Sawyer bug spray on your skin before going outdoors.

What is Sawyer Bug Spray?

Sawyer bug spray is a water-based insecticide that is safe to use around children and pets. It is also effective against various bugs in the bathroom, including mosquitoes, flies, ants, roaches, spiders, and ticks.

Unlike other bug sprays, Sawyer bug spray contains no harmful chemicals. This makes it a safer choice for your home and the environment.

Continue reading the benefits of applying bug spray and a step by step guide on how to apply here.

LAST UPDATED

October 5, 2023

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