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Why ticks are moving north

Summer tick season used to be a problem only in the southern part of Ontario, but tick populations are moving north as the climate grows warmer. A parasitologist at the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph explains how this migration is affecting people and their pets. Over 80 percent of the population living in eastern and central Canada could be living in risk areas for Lyme disease by 2020. We spoke to some experts about what you need to know about ticks and climate change in Ontario.

If your interested in learning more, find the link to the short video with host Nam Kiwanuka here.

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October 21, 2023

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