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Here's What to Do in a Boil Water Advisory




If your water is potentially contaminated, you must kill the germs before you drink it.

In Texas, record-low temperatures have led to rolling blackouts and carbon monoxide poisoning risks this week. Now, a second grim consequence has come from the unprecedented deep freeze: frozen water infrastructure and a fresh boil water advisory from hundreds of water systems in the Lone Star State.
There’s a double whammy at work in Texas. The outside temperature is enough to freeze the pipes underground, and electricity has failed for many people and facilities where indoor pipes can also freeze. That means water is exposed to dirt, germs, and more that typically isn’t part of the water circulation infrastructure.

So what does a boil water advisory mean, how does it make water safe to consume again, and what else can you do to make sure your water is clean and safe? Here’s what you need to know written by Caroline Delbert.


 

LAST UPDATED

May 4, 2022

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