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The Best Items to Stock for Any Emergency, According to Survivalists

Compiling a stash of emergency-preparedness items used to be a task many of us kept on the back burner — something we knew was important and we’d get to eventually. But eventually, we now know, might be closer than anyone thought. And while we’re not suggesting you start digging out an underground bunker and filling it with instant noodles, we’ve come to learn that having a few things on hand before you need them will only help you, even if it’s just mentally.

Most preppers, like Oregon’s Afrovivalist, Sharon Ross, equate preparation with peace of mind. “Once a person is prepared during a disaster,” she says, “they don’t feel the sense of urgency to go shopping for supplies.” So if visions of empty store shelves still haunt you, have a nice, calm look at our well-organized, detailed list of emergency supplies to keep on hand. To assemble it, we consulted recommendations from the CDC, Red Cross, the Department of Homeland Security, and the NYC Emergency Management Department. But those agencies give you only general categories, and we wanted specifics. So we interviewed 21 survivalists, preppers, bushcrafters, homesteaders, and emergency professionals about their favorite things to always have on-hand — and their advice to make your bugout (or bugin) the best it can possibly be.

Here are their suggestions, broken down into categories based on your level of survivalist instinct. There’s a lot to sift through here, but you can pick and mix products according to your needs. For many, a leaner survival kit makes more sense than a military-grade one. “Simplicity is key when prepping,” says Prepper Press founder Derrick James. Especially as, in a worst-case scenario, you might have to haul all of this gear a considerable distance. “It’s really important for people to know what their limitations are,” says emergency preparedness expert Aton Edwards, author of the upcoming book Afroprep Now!. “Don’t prove how strong you are by dragging around a 40-pound bag. Rage lift in the gym, don’t rage lift your bag.”

Are you interested in learning more? Continue reading the complete article written by Stacey Dee Woods and Katherine Gillespie here

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May 7, 2022

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My only complaint is that eventually, backflushing won’t be enough. These can clog up after some time and no amount of back flushing will fix its low flow. I went through 2 on the AT. However, it will attach to Smart Water Bottles and most bladders!

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Built for backcountry reliability and portability, the Sawyer Squeeze filter is our pick for the best portable water purifier.

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The Sawyer Squeeze was (by far) the most common Pacific Crest Trail water filter this year – for the fifth year in a row. It’s a $39, 3 oz / 85 g hollow fiber filter that rids your drinking water of protozoa and bacteria (and floaties). It can be used with Sawyer bags (included with the filter) or with compatible water bottles (Smartwater is the bottle of choice for many hikers).

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